CategoryPrimativism

Eezgii – Ээзгий

Dried mass of cheese.

Eezgii in a cloth sack for storage

Preparation

Cook the milk, and add a little Kefir, like with the preparation of Byaslag (cheese). But after curdling, keep everything cooking until all liquid has gone. Roast the dried mass a little more, until it turns into small pieces of golden color. The final product is dry enough to be stored in a sack of cloth (at least in the dry mongolian climate).

Use

Eezgii serves as a snack for nibbling in between. The taste is slightly sweet, with a grainy or floury texture on the tongue.

Byaslag – Бяслаг

Cheese from milk of cattle, yaks, goats, or sheep.

Most commonly, the milk of yak and cattle is used. Goats and sheep are not milked in all places, but make for the most aromatic cheese. However, mongolian cheese doesn’t get to ripen like its european counterparts, so the overall taste is somewhat bland in comparison.

Byaslag in a carton

Preparation

Boil the milk, and add a small amount of kefir (instead of rennet). After the milk has curdled, lift out the solid components with a large cloth. Let most of the remaining liquid drip off, and press the mass between some wooden boards with a weight. The resulting “wheels” of cheese will have a round or approximately square shape of about 25 cm diameter and 5 cm height.

In a nomadic household, it is not possible to let the cheese ripen as it is done in the european tradition (storing, turning, salting, etc.). Instead, you can cut it into slices and dry them for better preservation.

Use

Fresh slices of cheeses are eaten as a snack. Dried cheese is rather hard, and often gets soaked in tea. Pieces of cheese may also be given into a soup.

Nutting time is here.

It’s time to hit the trees and start gathering up the nuts for winter cooking.

Don’t forget the acorns as well if you flush the tannin from them by soaking in clean running water then they make great flour for flat cakes and a delicious thickener for stews.

Pit cooking

Dig a pit about 1-2 feet (30-60 cm) deep. The diameter should be equal to the depth.

· Pack the bottom of the pit and the walls.

· Cover the bottom with the hot stones and add a thin layer of soil on top.

· Wrap your meat in fresh green plant parts, such as leaves or moss.

· Place the package in the pit.

· Add a thin layer of soil on top and then more hot stones.

· Cover with earth or sand.

Hot stone cooking:

Simply light a fire above a bed of non-porous stones. Don’t use soft, porous stones with a high moisture content, which might explode on heating. This cooking method is ideal for fish, thin meat slices and frying eggs.

· Let the fire burn for an hour or more. In the meantime, prepare your food.

· Brush away fire and embers with a handful of long grass.

· Cook food directly on the hot rocks. Use it, as you would use a frying pan.

How to Make Parched Corn

1. Dry the corn. The primary ingredient of parched corn is dried corn. To dry fresh corn on the cob, hang it in a dry area of your home and allow it to dry out naturally. Frozen corn can be dried in a dehydrator or spread on a cookie sheet and placed in an oven set at 150 degrees. Leave the oven door open a little. This method can take a few hours and the corn should be turned occasionally to prevent burning.
2. Oil the skillet. Add a small amount of butter, lard or oil to a skillet. Cooking spray can also be used. Heat the oil on a low temperature. Wipe the frying pan with paper towel to remove any excess oil. Only a thin coating should remain on the bottom of the pan.
3. Pour the corn in the skillet. Add enough dry corn to the skillet to just about cover the bottom. The actual amount will depend on the size of the skillet.
4. Cook the corn. Allow the corn to cook slowly. Stir the dried corn constantly to prevent burning. The parched corn is done when the kernels have swollen, and turned a medium brown. A few of the kernels may explode, just like popcorn.
5. Drain the corn. Pour the parched corn onto some paper towel and allow to thoroughly drain and cool. Turn the corn a couple of times to ensure that all excess oil is absorbed.
6. Store the parched corn. Place the parched corn in a cloth or plastic bag for storage. A small plastic bag of parched corn will be enough for your next day of hiking.

Bantan

Bantan is a simple Mongolian soup of creamy texture made of meat and dough crumbs. Bantan is a favorite hangover remedy for Mongolians.

Ingredients:

Meat (beef or mutton)
Salt
Onion

Dough
Premium wheat flour
A pinch of salt
Water

Cooking time:
Approximately 30 minutes

Cut the meat into thin small slices, put in cold water, add salt and boil. Usually, Mongolians do not use lean meat because it does not produce a good bouillon. Therefore, leave the fat on and slice it together with meat. While the bouillon is being cooked, prepare the dough.

Dissolve a pinch of salt in cold water, mix in flour and blend with your fingers into small dough crumbs. Put the crumbs into the boiling bouillon and boil for 4-5 minutes until the soup becomes thick and creamy. You can add thinly sliced onion.

Using your preps.

Most people today have not lived in hard times.

One thing you have to consider in times of crisis is when to use your well preserved long storing preps.

In a long term disaster situation one thing you will have to do is save your long term storage foods as much as possible.

We are not speaking of minor storm disasters or other such events. We are talking about events that may cause you to be unable to replace them for years.

In these cases you will need to forage for fresh foods as much as possible and use them. Your preps should be saved for the times you are too sick to get fresh or in the times when other foods are totally unavailable.

Anyone that has grown up poor on a farm knows that late winter through early spring are the hungry times.

By late winter the wild game has been hunted down and is wary or it has migrated or went into hibernation. Your saved stocks of “fresh” foods are running low at this time as well. Many times this is when you are hitting the bottom of the bins in the root cellars.

New foods will not be available in any variety until part of the way through the spring.

Many times the mushrooms growing in the spring will be the first foods that are findable in any abundance.
The rest have to wait until they bear fruits or grow enough to be used.

These are the times when your precious well preserved foods will be needed. If you have already used them in times when other foods were available you will starve in the lean times.

Remember if things go really bad you will never be able to preserve foods as well as you can now. So make your well preserved items last as long as they can .

Some hard tack info out of the web archives

I found these in some archived Y2K discussions. Reposting for posterity.

“We make it for our Living History programs. here it is: 3 cups milk 8 cups plain flour 8 tbl spoons shortening (crisco) 6 tea spoon brown sugar (opt) 3 tea spoon salt Mix, roll on floured board, to 1/2″ thickness. cut into 3″ squares, punch holes 3 rolls of 3 with ice pick, Lightly grease baking pan, Bake in oven 400 deg for 45 min or till golden brown, cool in open air. Don’t store in plastic (no plastic in 1800’s) because of moisture. This recipe is the same they used except the sugar. We have found that a good dose of cinnamon, and not cooking it as long is good eatin’.”

Army Hardtack (cracker) Recipe From the Civil, Indian & 1st World War aka “Teeth Dullers”, “Sheet Iron”, “Flour Tile”, “Hard Bread”.

Ingredients:

4 cups flour (perferably whole wheat) 4 teaspoons salt Water (about 2 cups) Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees F Makes about 10 pieces

Mix flour and salt together in a bowl. Add just enough water (less than two cups) to make the mixture stick together. This will produce a dough that will not stick to hands, rolling pin or pan. The dough will have to be mixed by hand. Roll the dough out and shape it into a rough rectangle. Cut into the dough into squares about 3 X 3 inches and 1/2 inch thick.

After cutting, press into each square a pattern of four rows of four holes using a nail (a Philips screwdriver makes an interesting pattern). (Note: just ‘press’ into the dough, don’t punch through it. The appearance is similar to a modern saltine cracker.) Turn each square over and repeat.

Place on an ungreased cookie sheet in the oven and bake for 30 minutes. Turn each piece over and bake for another 30 minutes. The crackers should be slighthly brown on both sides.

When fresh the crackers are rather easily broken, but as they dry and harden they assume the consistentency of fired brick.

Hardtack crackers were a main staple of middle and late 19th century soldiers, though not a favorite. Most commonally associated with Civil War soldiers, hardtack was used well toward the end of the century. Usually reserved for issue to troops on the march or in the field, hardtack generally required some ‘spicing’ up to make it edible; particularly if the crackers were old or insect infested, as was frequently the case. Crackers produced in 1863 were being issued as late as 1890, moldly and full of bugs.

Soldiers had a number of methods for fixing hardtack, depending on what they had on hand. These included:

Eating plain. Breaking up the crackers in a pot of coffee. Breaking up the crackers in a soup or stew (as a thickening agent). Toasting a cracker over a fire and buttered. Soaking in cold water, browning in salt pork fat, then salting to taste. Soaking in condensed milk to make milk toast. Soaking in water, frying in salt pork fat, and topping with sugar. Crumbling crackers, mixing with bacon, rasins, and boiling in condensed milk.

Soldiers were quite inventive and there are, no doubt, many other methods of using hardtack.

Bibliography

Forty Miles a Day on Beans and Hay, Don Rickey, Jr., University of Oklahoma Press: Norman, 1963. Pages 48-51. Hardtack Recipe courtesy of the National Park Service. Soldier Life in the Union and Confederate Armies, Philip Van Doren Stern, ed.,Fawcett Publications: Greenwich, Conn, 1961. Pages 74-78.

World War One Army Hard Bread Recipe

You can use any hardtack receipe for this food item, just make the crackers 2 X 2 inches square instead of the larger 3 X 3 inches as per CW or Indian War era. It takes about 12-14 crackers to fill an 8 inch long carton, depending on the thickness of the crackers. See the receipe below.

Originally these crackers (called hard bread at this time) were packaged in pasteboard boxes approximately 8″ X 2 1/4″ X 2 1/4″ with flapped ends. The crackers were enclosed in a paper sleeve (like single-stack saltine crackers today) and then placed in the box.

Later, the bread was packaged in tins of similar dimensions as the pasteboard boxes. The tins were composed of a body and two end caps that were soldered on. This was apparently a response to the wet and soggy combat environment of France.American-made tins were marked on the end caps with “US” and a number of different markings depending on the manufacturer. French-made tins apparently did not have any markings on the end caps. 11 million pounds of hard bread were manufactured in France during the war. Both US- and French-made tins varied in construction styles. There were no pull tabs or keys (as on the corned beef tins) for opening the hard bread tin. The soldier was supposed to use his bayonet to open the tin.

Doughboys were generally issued at least two cartons of hard bread, although The Privates Manual by Colonel James Moss, 1916, pg 34 shows an illustration of the 1910 haversack loaded with 4 cartons of hard bread plus the condiment tin and bacon can.

Ingredients:

4 cups flour (perferably whole wheat) 4 teaspoons salt Water (about 2 cups) Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees F Makes about 15-18 2″ X 2″ pieces

Mix flour and salt together in a bowl. Add just enough water (less than two cups) to make the mixture stick together. This will produce a dough that will not stick to hands, rolling pin or pan. The dough will have to be mixed by hand. Roll the dough out and shape it into a rough rectangle. Cut into the dough into squares about 2 X 2 inches and 1/2 inch thick.

After cutting, press into each square a pattern of four rows of four holes using a nail (a Philips screwdriver makes an interesting pattern). (Note: just ‘press’ into the dough, don’t punch through it. The appearance is similar to a modern saltine cracker.) Turn each square over and repeat.

Place on an ungreased cookie sheet in the oven and bake for 30 minutes. Turn each piece over and bake for another 25 minutes. The crackers should be slighthly brown on both sides.

When fresh the crackers are rather easily broken, but as they dry and harden they assume the of fired brick consistentency.”

Roti are East Indian whole-wheat flatbreads

Roti are East Indian whole-wheat flatbreads that are simple and very tasty.

Mix 1 cup of whole wheat flour with 1 cup of cake flour, slowly add water so that it can be gathered together into a soft dough (usually takes just under a cup of water). Knead 7-8 minutes, make a ball, put it in a bowl and cover with a damp dishcloth. Let sit for half an hour. If the dough is too soft to form, flour your hands and knead until it holds. Divide into 12 balls, dust each with a little flour, cover and set aside. Heat a cast iron skillet on medium-low. Take a ball of dough and flatten it with your palms. Lightly dust both sides with flour. Roll it out to a 5-6 inch round. Once the skillet is hot, slap the round down and cook for 1 minute. Flip it and cook for about 30 seconds more. Then throw it under the broiler or over a gas flame for a few seconds to puff the roti. Eat hot, they don’t keep well but they don’t last long either.