MonthJuly 2010

Boortsog

Boortsog is a traditional Mongolian biscuit of various shapes deep-fried in hot oil. Bouillon fat that remains from cooking meat is traditionally used for the frying purpose. It gives boortsog a specific bouillon aroma that Mongolians like. However, any vegetable oil can be used for frying.

Ingredients:

Premium wheat flour – 1 kg
A pinch of salt
Sugar – 150 g
Butter – 100 g
Warm boiled water

Cooking time:
Approximately 2 hours

Dissolve salt, sugar and butter in warm boiled water and blend until the sugar and butter are completely dissolved and a smooth homogenous mixture is formed. Then, mix in flour and knead into smooth soft dough. The kneading process is very important for boortsog and may require sufficient strength and energy. The dough must be kneaded until such a state when no air remains in it. When the dough is cut, the profile must be absolutely smooth and homogenous with no hole or air bubble whatsoever. Reaching such a state will require a series of kneading and leaving the dough to rest. When the dough is ready, roll out until it is about 1-1.5 sm thick. Now, you can use your imagination to cut the dough into different shapes. However, the classic shaping is to cut the dough into stripes of 3-4 sm wide and cut out squares, triangles or any other shapes using a sharp knife. Using the knife, make two little cut-like lines on each piece. This is done in order to let the air out, if any left, as well as to give some decoration to boortsog. Some people cut the dough into rectangles that are 3 sm wide and about 10 sm long, make a long cut in the middle, pull simultaneously the two edges through the cut and twist to the opposite sides.

Preheat oil, put boortsog in bunches and fry until golden brown. Pull out with the strainer and put on the rack to cool down.

Boortsog can be eaten as is or with jam, butter, cheese or anything else of your choice. Boortsog can be stored for about a month and is an excellent replacement of bread during long trips.

Guriltai shol

Guriltai shol is a very simple and healthy Mongolian noodle soup made of meat and dough stripes. It is warms you up and is practically irreplaceable in cold winters. If the route to a man’s heart lies through his stomach, then the route to a Mongolian man’s heart will surely lie through a bowl of guriltai shol.

Ingredients:

Meat (beef or mutton)
Salt
Onion
Pepper and other seasonings (optional)

Dough
Premium wheat flour
A pinch of salt
Water

Cooking time:
Approximately 30 minutes

Cut the meat into thin slices, put in cold water, add salt and boil. Usually, Mongolians do not use lean meat because it does not produce a good bouillon. Therefore, leave the fat on and slice it together with meat. You can put bones with some meat to make the bouillon heartier. Such bones are removed when the bouillon is ready. While the bouillon is being cooked, prepare the dough.

Dissolve a pinch of salt in cold water, mix in flour and knead into smooth but enough hard dough. Leave the dough to rest. Knead again and roll out thinly. Cut into stripes of 3-4 sm wide, put 3-4 stripes on each other layering with sprinkles of flour to avoid sticking and slice into thin pieces.

Put the thin dough pieces into the boiling bouillon and boil for 4-5 minutes. Add thinly sliced onion. You may add pepper and other soup seasonings, however, these are not used for the classic Mongolian guriltai shol.

Pyartan

Pyartan is a variety of guriltai shol. However, the dough pieces are cut into thin rectangles or are randomly torn from the thinly rolled out dough stripes. The cooking process is the same as for guriltai shol..

Ingredients:

Meat (beef or mutton)
Salt
Onion
Pepper and other seasonings (optional)

Dough
Premium wheat flour
A pinch of salt
Water

Cooking time:
Approximately 30 minutes

Cut the meat into thin slices, put in cold water, add salt and boil. Usually, Mongolians do not use lean meat because it does not produce a good bouillon. Therefore, leave the fat on and slice it together with meat. You can put bones with some meat to make the bouillon heartier. Such bones are removed when the bouillon is ready. While the bouillon is being cooked, prepare the dough.

Dissolve a pinch of salt in cold water, mix in flour and knead into smooth but enough hard dough. Leave the dough to rest. Knead again and roll out thinly. Cut into stripes of 2-3 sm wide, put 3-4 stripes on each other layering with sprinkles of flour to avoid sticking and cut out thin rectangles.

Put the thin dough rectangles into the boiling bouillon and boil for 4-5 minutes. You can also randomly tear pieces from the dough stripes into the bouillon. Add thinly sliced onion

Bantan

Bantan is a simple Mongolian soup of creamy texture made of meat and dough crumbs. Bantan is a favorite hangover remedy for Mongolians.

Ingredients:

Meat (beef or mutton)
Salt
Onion

Dough
Premium wheat flour
A pinch of salt
Water

Cooking time:
Approximately 30 minutes

Cut the meat into thin small slices, put in cold water, add salt and boil. Usually, Mongolians do not use lean meat because it does not produce a good bouillon. Therefore, leave the fat on and slice it together with meat. While the bouillon is being cooked, prepare the dough.

Dissolve a pinch of salt in cold water, mix in flour and blend with your fingers into small dough crumbs. Put the crumbs into the boiling bouillon and boil for 4-5 minutes until the soup becomes thick and creamy. You can add thinly sliced onion.

Using your preps.

Most people today have not lived in hard times.

One thing you have to consider in times of crisis is when to use your well preserved long storing preps.

In a long term disaster situation one thing you will have to do is save your long term storage foods as much as possible.

We are not speaking of minor storm disasters or other such events. We are talking about events that may cause you to be unable to replace them for years.

In these cases you will need to forage for fresh foods as much as possible and use them. Your preps should be saved for the times you are too sick to get fresh or in the times when other foods are totally unavailable.

Anyone that has grown up poor on a farm knows that late winter through early spring are the hungry times.

By late winter the wild game has been hunted down and is wary or it has migrated or went into hibernation. Your saved stocks of “fresh” foods are running low at this time as well. Many times this is when you are hitting the bottom of the bins in the root cellars.

New foods will not be available in any variety until part of the way through the spring.

Many times the mushrooms growing in the spring will be the first foods that are findable in any abundance.
The rest have to wait until they bear fruits or grow enough to be used.

These are the times when your precious well preserved foods will be needed. If you have already used them in times when other foods were available you will starve in the lean times.

Remember if things go really bad you will never be able to preserve foods as well as you can now. So make your well preserved items last as long as they can .